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How Many Bees in a Hive

A hive can contain up to 70,000 bees in midsummer. There will be 1 queen, 250 drones, 20,000 female foragers, 30,000 female house-bees, 5,000 to 7,000 eggs, 7,000-11,000 larvae being fed, 16,000 to 24,000 larvae developing into adults in sealed cells.

All facts for Swarms (Public)

Swarm Control by Nick Withers

Published 17.Sep.2008, 6:22pm

Under One Roof

Beehive Management During the Swarming Season in a single hive

All beekeepers wish to be in control of their bees. They will wish for strong healthy hives at the start of the honey flow (whenever that is) so that they can get the best possible honey crop. They will not wish for his colonies to increase in number in an uncontrolled fashion or for swarms of bees to be lost as they take control of the agenda.

Swarm in a Oak Tree
Swarm in an Oak Tree

Click on the link above.

Comments

2 comment(s) on this page. Add your own comment below.

Hugh Allen
7.Jun.2009 5:55pm [ 1 ]

On 2nd June my only colony swarmed and I was unable to catch them. Because there were probably around 7 or 8 queen cells visible in the hive after the swarming, mostly capped, I was advised to get a second hive built (I already had the gear ready)and to transfer into a new brood chamber some frames containing at least 2 capped queen cells, brood and stores on 5 frames from the original hive, shake in two frames worth of flyers and nursers, put roof on, and stuff some grass in the entrance to the mesh floor. I did all this 2 days after the swarming on 4 June but this is where I got confused by conflicting advice - A said leave the two hives very close to each other so that the flying workers could eventually make a choice as to which hive to go to so as to equalise the numbers whereas B said move the new hive as far away as possible and more that 3 miles. Having surfed the net I now read that I may have been too late splitting the remaining colony and that an emerged queen may already have done the dirty on her siblings and that the split off colony may not have viable queen cells. Certainly I could not find a queen the day of the split but I was not actually expectibng to see one so may have missed. The original colony is still busy but 3 days later the new brooder is still stuffed with grass and, even though I have opened the entrance, there is almost no flights out. The bees inside are moving around, albeit a bit subdued, and I have now put on a feeder tray with 1 ltr of syrup (1kg to 1 ltr) to see if that will help, even though they seem to have enough stores anyway. As a novice what am I doing wrong if anything please?

Patricia McCoy
26.Jun.2015 10:25am [ 2 ]

I have been searching your website for a Swarm collector in Essex (Chelmsford area) without success - are you able to help me please?

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